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The Not-forking Software Reproducibility Tool

Not-forking lets you integrate non-diffable codebases, like patch/sed/diff/cp/mv rolled into one. Not-forking is a standard, machine-readable way of answering this question:

What is the minimum difference between multiple source trees, and how can this difference be applied as versions change over time?

Here is a picture of the simplest use case. External software, here called Upstream, forms a part of a new project called Combined Project. Upstream is not a library provided on your system, because then you could simply link to libupstream. Instead, Upstream is source code that you copy into the Combined Project directory tree like this:

Upstream Project file repository checkout then manually copy files Combined Project file repository Diagram 1: Not-forking Problem Overview
// Diagram 1
// Colours chosen for maximum visibility in all browsers, devices, light conditions and eyeballs
// given the limitations of pikchr.org, which is in turn limited by SVG being rendered independent of CSS
color=white
DiagramFrame: [

Upstream: file "Upstream Project" "file repository" fit rad 10px fill black
          file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of Upstream fill none
          move ; move

box at 1.2cm below Upstream.sw "checkout then" "manually copy files" rjust color green invisible

MyProj:   file "Combined Project" "file repository" fit rad 10px with .n at Upstream.se+(0.5,-0.5) fill black
MyProj2:  file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of MyProj fill none

arrow from Upstream.s down 1.5cm then right 1 to MyProj.w rad 20px thick color blue fill black
]

DiagramCaption: box "Diagram 1: Not-forking Problem Overview" italic bold fit height 200% with .n at 0.2cm below DiagramFrame.s color orange invisible

There are some obvious questions in this example:

If you are maintaining a codebase or configuration files that are mostly also maintained elsewhere, Not-forking could be the answer for you. Not-forking was designed to be part of a build tool, and can remove a lot of build system complexity.

Not-forking avoids project-level forking by largely automating change management in ways that version control systems such as Fossil, Git, or GitHub cannot. The full documentation goes into much more detail than this overview.

Referring to Diagram 1, the developer now has good reasons to separate Upstream project code from its repository and maintain it within the Combined Project tree, because in the short term it is just simpler. But that brings the very big problem of the Reluctant Project Fork. A Reluctant Project Fork, or "vendoring" as the Debian Project calls it, is where Combined Project's version of Upstream starts to drift from the original Upstream. Nobody wants to maintain code that is currently being maintained by its original authors, but it can become complicated to avoid that. Not-forking makes this a much easier problem to solve.

Not-forking produces a buildable tree from inputs that would otherwise need manual merging, or an algorithm so specific that it would become its own project. Rather than adding intelligence to a diff tool, Not-forking gets trees in a condition where diff will work. To do that it needs some guidance from a config file. Of course, at times there will be a merge conflict that requires human intervention, and since Not-forking uses all the ordinary VCS and diff tools, that is a normal merge resolution process. Not-forking understands and can compare many different human-readable styles of version numbering, and is able to monitor and pull from all kinds of upstreams.

Not-forking also addresses more complicated scenarios, such as when two unrelated projects are upstream of Combined Project:

Upstream 1 Git repo Upstream 2 tarball source Not-forking configs & source modifications Fossil repo make combined-project Makefile calls Not-forking to create combined build tree from upstreams+config+modifications Combined Project binary Diagram 2: Not-forking With Two Upstreams
// Diagram 2
// Colours chosen for maximum visibility in all browsers, devices, light conditions and eyeballs
// given the limitations of pikchr.org, which is in turn limited by SVG being rendered independent of CSS
color=white
DiagramFrame: [

scale=0.8
Upstream1: file "Upstream 1" "Git repo" fit rad 10px fill black
           file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of Upstream1 fill none
           move ; move
Upstream2: file "Upstream 2" "tarball source" fit rad 10px fill black
           file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of Upstream2 fill none
	   move ; move
MyProj:    file "Not-forking configs" "& source modifications" "Fossil repo" fit rad 10px fill black
MyProj2:   file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of MyProj fill none
           down

Make:      box "make combined-project" italic fit rad 20px ht 1 with .n at Upstream2.s+(0,-0.7) fill black
           down

NotFork:   file "Makefile calls Not-forking" "to create combined build tree" "from upstreams+config+modifications" fit rad 10px with .n at Make.s+(0,-0.8) fill black
           down

Combined:  file "Combined Project" "binary" fit rad 10px with .n at NotFork.s+(0,-0.9) fill black

arrow from Upstream1.s down 1.5cm then right 1 to Make.w rad 20px thick color blue
arrow from Upstream2.s down 1.5cm to Make.n rad 20px thick color blue
arrow from MyProj.s down 1.5cm then left 1 to Make.e rad 20px thick color blue
arrow from Make.s to NotFork.n rad 50px thick thick thick color red
arrow from NotFork.s to Combined.n rad 50px thick thick thick color red
]

DiagramCaption: box "Diagram 2: Not-forking With Two Upstreams" big bold italic fit height 200% with .n at 0.2cm below DiagramFrame.s color orange invisible

In more detail, the problem of project forking includes these cases:

The following diagram indicates how even more complex scenarios are managed with Not-forking. Any of the version control systems could be swapped with any other, and production use of Not-forking today handles up to 50 versions of three upstreams with ease.

Upstream 1 version 1 Upstream 1 version 2 Upstream 2 version 1 Upstream 2 version 2 Not-forking configs & source modifications Fossil repo make combined-project Upstream1v2+Upstream2v1 Makefile calls Not-forking to combine two upstreams plus any custom code Combined Project binary created Diagram 3: Not-forking With Multiple Versions and Multiple Upstreams
// Diagram 3
// Colours chosen for maximum visibility in all browsers, devices, light conditions and eyeballs
// given the limitations of pikchr.org, which is in turn limited by SVG being rendered independent of CSS
DiagramFrame: [

scale=0.8
color=white
Upstream1_1: file "Upstream 1" "version 1" fit rad 10px fill black
             file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of Upstream1_1 fill none
Upstream1_2: file "Upstream 1" "version 2" at Upstream1_1.e+(0.4,-0.5) fit rad 10px fill black
             file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of Upstream1_1 fill none
             move

Upstream2_1: file "Upstream 2" "version 1" fit rad 10px fill black at Upstream1_1.e+(1.5,0)
             file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of Upstream1_1 fill none
Upstream2_2: file "Upstream 2" "version 2" at Upstream2_1.e+(0.4,-0.5) fit rad 10px fill black
             file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of Upstream2_1 fill none
             move

MyProj:      file "Not-forking configs" "& source modifications" "Fossil repo" fit rad 10px fill black at Upstream2_1.e+(3,0)
MyProj2:     file same rad 10px at 0.1cm right of MyProj fill none
             down

Make:        box "make combined-project Upstream1v2+Upstream2v1" italic fit rad 20px ht 0.8 with .n at Upstream2_2.s+(0,-0.7) fill black
             down

NotFork:   file "Makefile calls Not-forking" "to combine two upstreams" "plus any custom code" fit rad 10px with .n at Make.s+(0,-0.8) fill black
           down

Combined:  box "Combined Project" "binary created" fit rad 20px ht 0.8 with .n at NotFork.s+(0,-0.9) fill black

arrow from Upstream1_2.s down 1.5cm then right 1 to Make.w rad 20px thick color blue
arrow from Upstream2_1.s down until even with Upstream1_2 then to Make.n rad 20px thick color blue
arrow from MyProj.s down 1.5cm then left 1 to Make.e rad 20px thick color blue
arrow from Make.s to NotFork.n rad 50px thick thick thick color red
arrow from NotFork.s to Combined.n rad 50px thick thick thick color red
]

DiagramCaption: box "Diagram 3: Not-forking With Multiple Versions and Multiple Upstreams" big bold italic fit height 200% with .n at 0.2cm below DiagramFrame.s color orange invisible

Download and Install Not-forking

You can download Not-forking via wget, Fossil, or git.

If you are reading this on Github, you are looking at a read-only mirror. The official home is the Fossil repository, and that is the best way to contribute and interact with the community. You may raise PRs on Github, but they will end up being pushed through Fossil anyway.

Here you will find the tool and its libraries, and the full documentation. It also contains an example configuration (in directory doc/examples) which can be used for testing. As of version 0.4, directory lib/NotFork/not-fork.d contains example configuration for the tool itself, used to find a specific version even if different from the one installed.

The Perl module Text::Glob is needed. Many operating systems package it under the name libtext-glob-perl. For example, on Debian or Ubuntu systems, type:

sudo apt install libtext-glob-perl

To download, you can use fossil clone or git clone, or, to download with wget:

wget -O- https://lumosql.org/src/not-forking/tarball/trunk/Not-forking-trunk.tar.gz | tar -zxf -
cd Not-forking-trunk

Once you have downloaded the Not-forking source, you can install it using:

perl Makefile.PL
make
sudo make install       # You need root for this step, via sudo or otherwise

At which point the not-fork command is installed in the system and its required modules are available where your perl installation expects to find them.

You might be wondering about runtime dependencies. That is covered in the full documentation, but in brief, not-fork knows what is needed for each of many different scenarios and it does not need to be addressed now. That means you don't need to worry about what not-fork might be used for when you install it. Currently not-fork can use access methods including Git, Fossil, wget/tar and ftp. Modules will likely be added, for example for Mercurial.

It is also possible to use the tool without installing by using the following commands:

perl Makefile.PL
make
perl -Iblib/lib bin/not-fork [options] ...

To try the tools using the included example configuration, use:

perl -Iblib/lib bin/not-fork -idoc/examples [other_options] ...

Why Not Just Use Git/Fossil/Other VCS?

Git rebase cannot solve the Not-forking problem space. Neither can Git submodules. Nor Fossil's merge, nor the quilt approach to combining patches.

A VCS cannot address the Not-forking class of problems because the decisions required are typically made by humans doing a port or reimplementation where multiple upstreams need to be combined. A patch stream can't describe what needs to be done, so automating this requires a tangle of fragile one-off code. Not-forking makes it possible to write a build system without these code tangles.

Examples of the sorts of actions Not-forking can take:

Disambiguation of "Fork"

The term "fork" has several meanings. Not-forking is addressing only one meaning: when source code maintained by other people elsewhere is modified by you locally. This creates the problem of how to maintain your modifications without also maintaining the entire original codebase.

Not-forking is not intended for permanent whole-project forks. These tend to be large and rare events, such as when LibreOffice split off from OpenOffice.org, or MariaDB from MySQL. These were expected, planned and managed project forks.

Not-forking is not intended for extreme vendoring either, as in the case decided by Debian in January 2021, where the up stream is giant and well-funded and guarantees it will maintain all of its own upstreams.

Not-forking is strictly about unintentional/reluctant whole-project forks, or ordinary-scale vendoring.

Here are some other meanings for the word "fork" that are nothing to do with Not-forking: